25-05-2018 Friday 05:07
Macao

FAQ

Q1
How much do I need to pay for the passenger fee?

In accordance with Portaria no. 282/96/M of 11 November, which has been revised by Portaria no. 152/98/M of 15 June, Executive Order no. 36/2004, Executive Order no. 26/2006 and Executive Order no. 13/2013, the passenger fee is MOP110 for each departing passenger who is above 2 years of age, but the transfer and transit passengers are exempted.

Exemptions of passenger and security fees are granted to the following passengers:

  1. Infants under 2 years of age;

  2. Direct transit passengers;

  3. Passengers in aircraft that due to technical, meteorological or similar contingency cases are forced to return to the airport;

  4. Passengers with diplomatic passports;

  5. Passengers with traveling documents issued by the People’s Republic of China and hold certain high-ranking positions in the PRC government;

  6. Passengers in aircraft using the airport for purposes that might justify the exemption;

  7. Transfer passengers who arrive at the airport on a designated flight and then board a different flight in the same aircraft or a different aircraft without going through the immigration formalities, who continue to travel by air within 48 hours upon arrival at Macau International Airport with or without going through the immigration formalities or who use the Macau International Airport "Express Link" service and arrive at the airport to board an aircraft without going through the immigration formalities. 

Please click 4.png to view the full terms of the regulation.

Note: The passenger fee is not tax charged by the government. It is collected by CAM-Macau International Airport Co. Ltd and form part of their revenue.

Q2
How is the passenger fee collected?

The passenger fee is collected from each departing passenger through the airline upon issuance of the air ticket.

Q3
If I have not departed from Macao by air, but have already paid for the passenger fee upon purchase of air tickets. Can I have the fee refund?

As the passenger fee is collected from each departing passenger through the airline upon issuance of the air ticket, a passenger should contact the airline or the travel agency through which they book the air ticket to get the refund.

Q4
How much do I need to pay for the security fee?

In accordance with Portaria no. 282/96/M of 11 November, which has been revised by Portaria no. 152/98/M of 15 June, Executive Order no. 36/2004, Executive Order no. 26/2006 and Executive Order no. 13/2013, the security fee is MOP30 for each departing passenger (including transfer and transit passengers) who is above 2 years of age, paid by the air operator. 

Exemptions of security fee is granted to the following passengers:  

  1. Infants under 2 years of age;

  2. Passengers in aircraft that due to technical, meteorological or similar contingency cases are forecd to return to the airport;

  3. Passengers in aircraft using the airport for purposes that might justify the exemption.

Please click 4.png to view the full terms of the regulation.

Note: The security fee is not tax charged by the government. It is collected by CAM-Macau International Airport Co. Ltd and form part of their revenue.

Q1
Where can I check the departure and arrival information?

The real-time departure and arrival information is available at the following websites:

Macau International Airport  www.macau-airport.com

Or passengers can phone to Macau International Airport at tel. (853) 2886 1111 to make a flight enquiry.

Q2
Which entity should I contact for general enquiries, such as flight schedules or baggage lost, etc?

You may go to the Information Counters at the departures or the arrivals levels in the airport to check the information. Or you can phone to Macau International Airport at (853) 2886 1111 to make your enquiry.

Q1
When should I arrive at the airport and check-in for flight?

In accordance with the worldwide practice for check-in procedures which is also practised in Macau International Airport, all passengers are required to check in at least two hours before flight departure.

Q2
In what circumstances will I not be accepted for check-in?

Passengers will not be accepted for check-in if they are unable to present a valid air ticket, passport or a visa for entry under the requirements of the countries of destination. Passengers are advised to contact the airlines for enquiry before departure.

Q1
Which entity should I contact for complaints regarding ticket refund or change of flight date?

For issues concerning ticket refund or change of flight date, or requests for compensation due to the aforementioned reasons, as these issues are concerned with the customer service of the airlines who will make decisions according to their own operational policies, you are advised to contact the airlines directly.

For the airport facilities and the daily operations, you may contact Macau International Airport via the following correspondence:

Tel: (853) 2886 1111
Fax: (853) 2886 1296
Address: Macau International Airport, Taipa, Macau
www.ada.com.mo

Q2
What is the limit of liability resulting from the destruction, loss, damage or delay of baggage and which entity should I contact for compensation?

According to Article 7 of the Administrative Regulation No. 11/2004 as amended by the Administrative Regulation No.19/2011, the uppermost limit to be paid by the airline to a passenger is 1,131 Special Drawing Rights (Please click4.pngto refer to the USD-equivalent, and then exchange to MOP-equivalent). You should contact the airlines directly for requests for compensation.

Please click2.png3.pngto view the full terms of the regulation or go to the special session of “Civil Liability Regime for the Air Operator and Aircraft Operator” to read the details.

Q3
Which entity should I contact for enquiry or refund if the airline claims that the air tickets which I bought from the travel agencies are invalid ?

Passengers are advised to liaise with the check-in counter for enquiry first. As the tickets are purchased through the travel agencies, passengers should contact the travel agencies through which they book the air tickets for any further enquiry or refund.

Q1
What items are prohibited to be taken on board the aircraft?

In accordance with the Administrative Regulation no. 31/2003, weapons, explosives or articles likely to be utilized to commit an act of unlawful interference or articles or substances which are capable of posing significant risk to health, safety or property to be transported by air are not allowed to be taken onto an aircraft cabin. These substances or articles include:

  1. Firearms;

  2. Ammunition or explosive materials;

  3. Pointed or bladed items;

  4. Martial art devices;

  5. Incapacitating substances;

  6. Inflammable substances;

  7. Gas and aerosols;

  8. Toxic and Infectious substances;

  9. Magnetized materials;

  10. Radioactive materials.

Please click2.png3.pngto view the provisions governing such restriction.

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Q2
Which entity should I contact for reclaiming a confiscated item and within how many days should I reclaim for it?

If a confiscated item does not present some risk involving storage, the item will be removed and stored at the Macau International Airport. You shall be informed by means of an adequate leaflet that you may reclaim the item within 15 days of the date of confiscation.

For queries, you may contact SEMAC (Security for Macau International Airport) via the following correspondence:

Tel: (853) 8598 8665 / 8598 8666
Fax: (853) 8598 8667 
Email: semac@macau.ctm.net 
Address: Av. Wai Long, CAM Office Building, 2/F., Taipa, Macau 
www.macau-airport.com/site/php/en/operator_semac.php

Q3
Does an arriving passenger need to get prior permission for the possession of weapons of estimated value, if the weapons are not regarded as restricted items and can be taken on board the aircraft?

Yes. An arriving passenger who wishes to bring a weapon into Macao should contact the Public Security Police Force (CPSP) through the following correspondence for obtaining permits prior to transporting it into the territory.

Tel: (853) 2857 3333 
Fax: (853) 2878 0826 
Email: psp-info@fsm.gov.mo 
www.fsm.gov.mo/psp

Q1
What are dangerous goods? How are they classified?

Dangerous goods are articles or substances that are capable of posing a risk to health, safety, property or the environment when transported by air. There are many everyday items which seem harmless but can be a threat to the safety of passengers and crew when they are brought on an aircraft; hence they are often forbidden to be carried by passengers either in the aircraft cabin or their baggage. These dangerous goods are classified by International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) into 9 classes as follows:

Class 1 Explosives
Class 2 Gases
Class 3 Flammable liquids
Class 4 Flammable solids; substances liable to spontaneous combustion; substances in which, contact with water, emit flammable gas
Class 5 Oxidizing substances and organic peroxides
Class 6 Toxic and infectious substances
Class 7 Radioactive materials
Class 8 Corrosive substances
Class 9 Miscellaneous dangerous goods (e.g. lithium batteries) 

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Q2
What are the requirements for the carriage of lithium batteries by air?

Electronic devices (e.g. laptop computers, cellular phones, cameras, camcorders and so on) or portable medical electronic devices containing lithium metal batteries not exceeding 2 grams or lithium ion batteries not exceeding 100 Wh can be carried both in carry-on baggage or checked-in baggage. All spare batteries must be put in carry-on baggage.

For electronic devices or portable medical electronic devices containing lithium metal batteries exceeding 2 grams but not exceeding 8 grams or lithium ion batteries exceeding 100Wh but not exceeding 160 Wh, OR if for health reasons or other special reasons mobility aids (e.g. wheelchairs) that are powered by lithium batteries must be carried during the travel, passengers must make the request to the airline. With the approval of the airline, passengers can then follow the instructions given by the airline to put the devices in carry-on baggage or checked-in baggage.  However, all spare batteries must still be put in carry-on baggage.

Q3
How do we calculate the watt hour rating for the lithium battery?

Measurement:

Wh = Watt hour = Ampere Hour x Voltage

Q1
According to the Macao aviation legislation, do passengers need to switch off electronic devices throughout the whole flight? Can cellular phones be used if they are turned to the flight mode?

In accordance with the Air Navigation Regulation of Macau which was approved by Executive Order No. 62/2016, before the aircraft takes off on any flight, the captain or the cabin crew member (in the name of the captain) should notify passengers that during certain stages of the flight no use can be made of products and electronic devices which can possibly endanger the safety of the flight.

The airlines incorporated in Macao have devised their company policy and their operational guidelines in accordance with the above requirement. In order to ensure that the communication between the aircraft and the air traffic control tower will not be interfered by other signals, the airlines will request passengers to switch off all electronic devices, including cellular phones, during take-offs and landings.  During en-route, when a passenger needs to use an electronic device, the cabin crew member will indicate permission or prohibition according to the company policy and the operational guidelines. It must be pointed out that different airlines will have different policies and guidelines. Some airlines allow passengers to use electronic devices as long as it is not during a take-off or a landing; some airlines will impose restrictions on the use of electronic devices, e.g. phones must be turned to the flight mode. It is therefore advisable that wherever the flight is taken, passengers should enquire the cabin crew member about the use of electronic devices if they need to use them.

In Macao (Note), if a passenger does not obey to the instruction made by the cabin crew member on the prohibited use of electronic devices, the passenger is considered to have violated No. 3), Provision 1, Article 4 of Administrative Regulation No. 31/2003. The captain of the flight can impose necessary measures on the passenger in accordance with the powers given to him/her by Article 5 of the same Regulation.

Note: The scope of applicability includes passengers who take the flight of a Macao registered aircraft, passengers who take the flight of an aircraft leased in by a Macao incorporated airline, or passengers who take the flight which originates from or is destined to Macao.

Q1
What is the definition for an unruly passenger?

An unruly passenger is defined as someone whose behavior violates the proper order and the discipline inside an aircraft or endangers the aircraft or the lives and properties of other people inside the aircraft. The legal definition of an unruly passenger can be viewed in Administrative Regulation no. 31/2003.

Please click2.png3.pngto view the regulation. 

Q2
What types of behavior are considered prohibited inside an aircraft?

In accordance with Administrative Regulation no. 31/2003, the types of behavior prohibited inside an aircraft include:

  • Transporting restricted items;

  • Smoking inside toilets or other places that prohibit such behavior;

  • Using electronic devices that are prohibited;

  • Disobeying the proper and fair instructions intended to protect the safety of the aircraft or the people and their properties, or intended to maintain the order and the discipline inside the aircraft, given by the pilot or the crew making the instructions under the name of the pilot;

  • Destroying or preventing the operation of any smoke detectors or other protection devices installed inside the aircraft;

  • Release any untrue information that can affect the safety of the aircraft.

Please click2.png3.pngfor the full terms of the regulation.

Q3
What are the penalties on unruly passengers?

In accordance with Administrative Regulation no. 31/2003, depending on the seriousness of the behaviour, an unruly passenger may be penalized with a fine of MOP5, 000.00 to MOP50,000.00. If the case should be transferred to the police for handling and filed with the court for inquest, the court will undergo arbitration in accordance with the applicable laws and regulations.

Please click2.png3.pngfor the full terms of the regulation.

Q1
Can a flight take off or land under typhoon?

In what concerns the weather conditions, the take-off or landing of a flight or an aircraft depends on the following two factors:

Wind speed, wind direction and visibility: When a typhoon is hoisted causing a high speed wind, whether it be a signal number 3, 8, 9 or 10, a flight can still take off or land if the wind direction is suitable for the operation of take-offs and landings. On the contrary, when a typhoon is down, the heavy rain resulting from it might lower the visibility. In such case, a flight cannot take off or land, even though the signal number is removed and the wind.

The aircraft type: Different aircraft types have different capability to withstand wind. When a typhoon is hoisted, if the wind speed can allow a particular aircraft type to take off or land, a flight can therefore perform a take-off or a landing.

Q2
Who decides whether a flight can take off or land under typhoon?

For any take-off or landing, the airport submits all necessary real-time weather information to the pilot of a flight. When the pilot receives such information, he or she then decides to perform a take-off or landing in accordance with the weather conditions at that moment and the internal guidelines of the airline for such operation. Such custom is a worldwide practice in international air traffic.

Q3
Does Macau International Airport still operate under typhoon?

Yes. According to the requirement of International Civil Aviation Organization, an airport should, in addition to serving flights operating to it, also serve as an alternate airport for other flights not commercially destined to it. Therefore, even in the case of bad weather or when a typhoon is hoisted, whether it be a signal number 3, 8, 9 or 10, Macau International Airport will not close but operate 24 hours as usual. However, passengers should understand that flights might be affected or delayed due to unstable weather conditions.

Q1
Does Macao’s aviation legislation regulate flying? Does a resident or an organization have to apply if they wish to carry out a flying activity, e.g. flying the model aircraft, releasing latex balloons to air, flying the lantern and so on? How can they apply?

In accordance with the relevant Macao’s legislation, namely Article 6 of Portaria No. 233/95/M of 14 August which has been revised by Chief Executive’s Despacho No. 295/2010, a resident or an organization who wishes to carry out a flying activity in Macao must get the written permission from the Civil Aviation Authority. The flying activities include performing an organized release of latex balloons; flying a captive balloon, a kite, a hot air balloon, a lantern, a model aircraft or an unmanned aerial vehicle which is over 7 kg; installing or operating external laser lights or search lights; performing aerial shows and so on. 

Please click 4.png to download the flying activities application forms

In accordance with the Air Navigation Regulation of Macau, the restrictions on unmanned aircraft operations in Macao air traffic control zone are as follows:

1. Unless with the authorization in writing of the Civil Aviation Authority and in accordance with any conditions to which that authorization may be granted, within the Macao air traffic control zone a person shall not operate an unmanned aircraft to fly, at any height, unless the operation is performed indoors or with the authorization in writing of the Civil Aviation Authority and in accordance with any conditions to which that authorization may be granted.

2. All unmanned aircraft weighing more than 250 grams must be labelled with the name and phone number of the owner in Chinese, Portuguese or English languages and the information must be easily legible to the reader.

3. Subject to sub-paragraph (4), a person may operate an unmanned aircraft under the following conditions:

  1. the unmanned aircraft weighs 7 kg or less;

  2. the unmanned aircraft flies at a height not greater than 30 m (100 ft) above the surface;

  3. the operation takes place during day time;

  4. the unmanned aircraft is not carrying any dangerous substances, including weapons and ammunitions, corrosive, flammable or explosive substances, fireworks, firecrackers, any chemical or biological agent or toxin and any radioactive material or substance;

  5. the unmanned aircraft is not discharging anything whether gaseous, liquid or solid;

  6. the unmanned aircraft is not towing any object; 

  7. the unmanned aircraft is not flying within 100 metres of a gathering of 100 persons or more;

  8. the operator is on site within 100 metres and with direct control of the unmanned aircraft;

  9. the unmanned aircraft is operated under a Visual Line of Sight Operation (VLOS); and

  10. the operator is reasonably satisfied that the flight can safely be made.

4. A person shall not operate any unmanned aircraft to fly, at any height, over any part of a protected area, including: 

  1. The airspace within 1000 metres of any aerodrome or landing location, and the aircraft flight path area; (Protection Area)

  2. The airspace within 50 metres of the Macao Government headquarters, the Legislative Assembly Building, the Court of Final Appeal Building, the official residences of the Chief Executive and principal officials of Macao, the Central People’s Government institutions in Macao as defined by Regulamento Administrativo no. 22/2000, the Macao Prison, the youth Correctional Institution, the Ka Ho power station and electrical power substations, The Macao Water Supply Company headquarters and the Ka-Ho Fuel farm; 

  3. Areas over which the Civil Aviation Authority has restricted or prohibited flying in accordance with paragraph 66 of the Air Navigation Regulation of Macau;

In accordance with Provision 16 of Decree Law No. 52/94/M of 7 November, anyone who performs a flying activity in the protection area as set forth in the aeronautical restrictions and does not comply with the above requirements will be liable to a fine of MOP2,000.00 to MOP20,000.00 imposed by AACM. 

Application with detailed information can be submitted to the Civil Aviation Authority by post, fax, email or in person at least 10 working days in advance. No fee is charged. The evaluation and approval process takes no more than 10 working days. 

AACM takes the opportunity to highlight that the main objective of the legislation is to ensure aviation safety. It is not the objective to purposely create a means to disturb people from leisure. Ever since Macau International Airport has been put into operation, the air transport has become an important means for Macao residents to travel abroad. The SAR government has the responsibility to establish a decent clearance environment to guarantee the safe operations of the industry. It is through this way that the living and the traveling of our residents can be protected.

Q2
What are the procedures for granting the permission in conducting aerial photography or aerial survey?

The airspace of Macao is up to 3,000 feet (about 900 meters). If the flight level is below 3,000 feet, you must get the permission from our Authority before conducting aerial photography or aerial survey flights. Please click4.pngto view the requirements of application. You should download the application form for operation of non-scheduled flights and return the completed form with all the relevant documents to us in person, by post or fax at least 3 days in advance.

If the flight level is above 3,000 feet, it would be in China or Hong Kong airspace. You may contact the Hong Kong Civil Aviation Department (HKCAD) or the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) for getting the permission. Their correspondence is as below:

CAAC
Tel: 010-64092972
Email: webmaster@caac.gov.cn
www.caac.gov.cn

HKCAD Headquarter
Tel: +852 2910 6342
Fax: +852 2910 6351
Email:enquiry@cad.gov.hk
www.cad.gov.hk

Q1
What are the procedures for granting the permission on crane erection?

You can click4.pngto download the application form for crane erection and return the completed application form with all the relevant documents to our Authority in person, by letter or fax at least 7 working days in advance.

Q1
What do

In accordance with Article 6 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (or the Chicago Convention), “no scheduled international air service may be operated over or into the territory of a contracting State, except with the special permission or other authorization of that State, and in accordance with the terms of such permission or authorization.” An airline of a state wishing to operate to another state should therefore get the permission from that other state. The common way to achieve this is for the two states to sign a bilateral Air Services Agreement (ASA). The ASA covers provisions including the “freedoms of the air”, in other words the traffic rights, of the aircraft of both Contracting States to enter into and land on the territory of each other.

Q2
What are the definitions of the different "freedoms of the air"?

The freedoms of the air are a set of traffic rights granting the airline(s) of a country the privilege to enter and land in another country's airspace. The freedoms of the air are classified into 9 categories whose definitions are given in the following table. The first five "freedoms" have been officially recognized by international treaty known as "International Air Transport Agreement or Five Freedoms Agreement".

1st Freedom of the Air

the right or privilege, in respect of scheduled international air services, granted by one State to another State or States to fly across its territory without landing (also known as a 1st Freedom Right)

2nd Freedom of the Air

the right or privilege, in respect of scheduled international air services, granted by one State to another State or States to land in its territory for non-traffic purposes (also known as a 2nd Freedom Right)

3rd Freedom of The Air

the right or privilege, in respect of scheduled international air services, granted by one State to another State to put down, in the territory of the first State, traffic coming from the home State of the carrier (also known as a 3rd Freedom Right)

4th Freedom of The Air

the right or privilege, in respect of scheduled international air services, granted by one State to another State to take on, in the territory of the first State, traffic destined for the home State of the carrier (also known as a 4th Freedom Right)

5th Freedom of The Air

the right or privilege, in respect of scheduled international air services, granted by one State to another State to put down and to take on, in the territory of the first State, traffic coming from or destined to a third State (also known as a 5th  Freedom Right)

6th Freedom of The Air

the right or privilege, in respect of scheduled international air services, of transporting, via the home State of the carrier, traffic moving between two other States (also known as a 6th Freedom Right).

7th Freedom of The Air

the right or privilege, in respect of scheduled international air services, granted by one State to another State, of transporting traffic between the territory of the granting State and any third State with no requirement to include on such operation any point in the territory of the recipient State, i.e the service need not connect to or be an extension of any service to/from the home State of the carrier.

8th Freedom of The Air

the right or privilege, in respect of scheduled international air services, of transporting cabotage traffic between two points in the territory of the granting State on a service which originates or terminates in the home country of the foreign carrier or (in connection with the so-called 7th Freedom of the Air) outside the territory of the granting State (also known as a 8th Freedom Right or "consecutive cabotage").

9th Freedom of The Air

the right or privilege of transporting cabotage traffic of the granting State on a service performed entirely within the territory of the granting State (also known as a 9th Freedom Right or "stand alone" cabotage).

Source: Manual on the Regulation of International Air Transport (Doc 9626, Part 4)

Q3
What is an Air Services Agreement? Can Macao conclude an Air Services Agreement with a foreign country on its own?

An Air Services Agreement is an agreement which two countries sign to allow civil aviation activities between their territories. 

Although Macao SAR is part of China and is not a country itself, as stipulated in Article 117 of the Basic Law that Macao SAR “may formulate on its own various systems for the civil aviation management, with the authorization of the Central People’s Government”, Macao SAR enjoys the autonomy to conclude and sign a bilateral Air Services Agreement with a foreign country.

Taiwan and Hong Kong SAR are also integral parts of China; these two cities, therefore, cannot be served as intermediate points or beyond points in the route schedule concluded by Macao SAR and a foreign country in an Air Services Agreement.